An Anthropometry Study of the Shoulder Region in a Chinese Population and its Correlation with Shoulder Disease

DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-95022013000200020
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Ming-Yang Yu; Wei Zhang; De-Bao Zhang; Xiao-Dong Zhang & Gui-Shan Gu

Summary

Purpose: There is a paucity of data which reflected the relationship between morphology and incidence of shoulder disorders with respect to the ethnic Chinese population. We used anteroposterior radiographs to measure the Acromion Index (AI) and Acromioglenoid Angle (AA) of Chinese patients. The baseline was defined as the line that connected the superior and inferior osseous margins of the glenoid cavity. In order to calculate the AI, the distance from the baseline to the lateral margin of the acromion was measured and then divided by the distance from the baseline to the lateral aspect of the humeral head. The AA was defined as the angle formed by the intersecting line drawn tangent to the sclerotic line of the acromion undersurface and the baseline point. The AI and AA were determined in three groups: 165 patients (average age, 60.2 years) with chronic shoulder symptoms; in an age and gender-matched acute injury group of 61 patients (average age, 44.3 years); and in an age and gender-matched control group of 63 volunteers (average age, 37.3 years).The average AI and standard deviation was 0.72 ± 0.06 in shoulders with subacromial impingement syndrome, 0.59 ± 0.06 in those with acute injury, and 0.66 ± 0.06 in normal shoulders. The average AA and standard deviation was 76.8°±7.02 in shoulders with subacromial impingement syndrome, 84.2°±7.81 in those with acute injury, and 80.0°± 7.33 in normal shoulders. The AI and AA varied between patients with acute and chronic shoulder problems.

KEY WORDS: Acromioglenoid angle; Acromion index; Chinese population; Rotator cuff Injuries; Acromial Tilt.

How to cite this article

YU, M-Y.; ZHANG, W.; ZHANG, D-B.; ZHANG, X-D. & GU, G.S. An anthropometry study of the shoulder region in a Chinese population and its correlation with shoulder disease. Int. J. Morphol., 31(2):485-490, 2013.